Robotics

Helpers you can rely on in a crisis

Dependable, robust and indestructible – service robots have been providing back-up to medical staff during the COVID-19 crisis. Unlike humans they don't catch the virus or get tired. This is a big help when it comes to containing the spread of the infection.

3 min
Hildegard Kaulen
Published on 11. Mai 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered a real boom in service robots. There are currently four types in use. Protection robots screen areas off, take people's temperature and remind them to wear a mask. Delivery robots transport food, laboratory samples and medicines. Care robots look after infectious people who could easily spread the virus. And lastly, cleaning robots help disinfect rooms and surfaces and prevent infection.

Cleaning robot disinfects an aircraft using ultraviolet light.
A cleaning robot disinfects an aircraft using ultraviolet light and destroys the genetic material of SARS-CoV-2 and all other germs on board.
Green disinfection robot in India.
In India, they use green disinfection robots to desinfect streets and public places.
A delivery robot in Manila, Philippines.
A delivery robot provides for people who have had to quarantine in the Philippines capital Manila.
An Italian pharmacy uses a protective robot to take its customers' body temperature.
An Italian pharmacy uses a protective robot to take its customers' body temperature. Customers can only enter if their temperature is normal.
In China it is common that robots are identifying people, recognizing signs of infection and disinfecting surfaces
Identifying people, recognizing signs of infection and disinfecting surfaces – these robots are a common sight in China.
Service Robot helps the employees on the COVID-19 ward in an Italian clinic.
A moment of prayer for these employees of an Italian clinic before they return to work on the COVID-19 ward. The service robot will be on hand to help.
In India care robots support nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic.
In the pandemic, any assistance is appreciated. In an Indian hospital, two nurses make the acquaintance of an interactive service robot.

By Hildegard Kaulen

Hildegard Kaulen, PhD, is a molecular biologist. Following positions at Rockefeller University in New York and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, she now works as a freelance science journalist for newspapers and scientific magazines.