Understanding immunity

Antibody tests are gaining importance as a control tool, especially during the pandemic. Hear our expert talk.

min
Published on 30. März 2021

It’s just over one year since COVID-19 became a familiar term around the world. Due to quick action and collaborative innovation from science and medicine, vaccines have been developed and are being distributed at a pace unrivaled in human history. But the work doesn’t stop there.

Regularly monitoring vaccine efficacy and surveying human behavior among the vaccinated population are crucial to understanding its durability. Antibody testing will continue to be important, long after vaccines have been administered.

Our guest speaker is Angela Rasmussen, MD, a virologist and affiliate of the Georgetown Center for Global Health, Science and Security. She collects evidence about the human response to emerging viruses to gain a better understanding of vaccine efficacy.

In this podcast Angela Rasmussen, MD and Deepak Nath, President of Laboratory Diagnostics at Siemens Healthineers discuss all aspects of antibody testing for SARS-CoV-2. Hear about how the tests are implemented, how they determine an immune response is present, and why testing for antibodies is such an important part of the battle against this virus.

We’ll also hear from University of Missouri (MU) scientists Mark Daniels, MD and Professor of Immunology, John R. Middleton, MD and Professor of Livestock Health, and Enid Schatz, MD, and Chair of the Department of Public Health. The university is conducting an antibody testing study – both biological and behavioral – and these experts on the ground at MU will explain the antibody testing process from start to finish.

Understanding Immunity: How Antibody Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Works and What We Can Learn from it with Dr. Angela Rasmussen and the Mizzou Antibody Testing Team | Deepak Nat‪h‬
21 min
It’s just over one year since COVID-19 became a familiar term around the world. Due to quick action and collaborative innovation from science and medicine, vaccines have been developed and are being distributed at a pace unrivaled in human history. But, the work doesn’t stop there.